Creative Closets DIY

The key to creating a “creative” closet is to use your imagination and personalize the space as much as possible. People have hobbies, collections or odd tastes that could be accommodated by a creatively designed closet. Do you like to sew? Do you have a lot of camera equipment? Do you have a lot more shoes than you are willing to admit? Whatever is special about you and your storage needs should be used to create your personal creative closet.

Let’s take photography equipment, for example. This could also go for any electronic equipment, like video games, old home movies, computer parts, pretty much anything that you would like to keep stored away, safe and dust free. Your creative closet might include a cabinet system instead of a shelf system. You will probably want to be able to seal up the area where these things are kept to protect them from the massive amount of lint that is created when you take out and put clothes into a closet each day.

You can build a tall series of shelves, depending on how much storage space that you need, and then screw on a pre-fabricated cabinet door to seal it off. Don’t use a magnet closure if you are worried about it affecting your equipment. You can install a child-proof cabinet lock to keep out children if you’d like. Doors with a clear plastic or frosted glass front look really nice in a closet and allow you to see what is inside without opening the door. Use bags that are padded and seal well to protect your equipment even more.

Craft supplies are also sometimes kept in the closet. For instance, if you sew, but you don’t have a sewing room, you may need to store your sewing machine, material, patterns, and a plethora of small items like pins, threaders and thread. You can create a sewing station in your closet, much in the same fashion as the electronic system mentioned above.

Pegs can be installed or a thread rack hung to hold many spools of thread on the outside of the cabinet right where you can see it. You can attach hooks for scissors, measuring tape, elastic and other items that you use often. Inside you can have a shelf for your sewing machine and foot pedal. Use an organizer to keep track of all of those tiny items that come along with a sewing hobby. Stacks of material and scraps can be kept in crates, baskets or bins inside the cabinet.

Use your creativity to make your closet meet your special needs. To make more room for specific types of storage, you may want to compress the amount of space that your clothes take up by using specialty pants hangers, shirt hangers and skirt hangers that allow you to cascade clothing from one simple hook. Remember, this is your closet and it should fit your needs!

About the Author: Charlie Hafter is on the staff of Closet Hanger Factory, a leading online resource for shirt hangers, skirt hangers, pants hangers and dress hangers. Get all of the accessories you could need at http://www.closethangerfactory.com, which is recognized worldwide for their excellent quality hangers.

DIY Closets Know How

Creating a closet all by yourself is so fun and also a rewarding experience.  Exercise your unique views and creative side by diving into a fun, DIY closet project.  Cookie-cutter closet systems are often a waste because they don’t accommodate exactly what you need and end up wasting space, instead of saving space, in your closet.  You are much better off either creating your own system or buying a modular system that helps you to make the most of the space you have.  Use these guidelines to learn how to best determine what space you’ll need and which items can save you the most time, space and money.

1)  Take an inventory of what you have, getting rid of whatever you can as you go through each thing.  Experiment with categories of clothing, arrangements by length, color, use, or whatever you can think of that makes sense to you.  The most common way to organize a closet is to put the things that you use most often in the front and center of the closet.  Everything else will go around that central area getting further and further away as its frequency of use declines.  You will need to decide what is most likely going to be effective for you and your habits.

2)  Next you can play around with whether your clothing will take up less room hung or folded.  Some things don’t necessarily need to be hung, like pajamas, for instance, but you may find that they take up less space when hung on hangers.  You may be able to adjust the height of your hanging bar and add an additional bar near the floor, just high enough for your pants to hang.  Play around a bit, taking measurements of folded stacks and calculating hanging bar space.  You may want to consider clothes hangers that cascade from each other, making 2, 3, 4, or 5 items take up the space of one.  This trick can save you a lot of space in the closet.

3)  After you determine what is to be hung and what you want to be folded or kept in a container or drawer, start thinking about what types of storage would be most useful or efficient.  If you use clear containers, you will be able to easily see what is inside.  This will often times mean that you can use slimmer, deeper, or taller containers instead of bulky, shallow ones that take up too much space.  Keeping shoes in plastic stackable bins allows you to free up closet floor space by stacking shoes up one corner of the closet.  This space can be used for a laundry basket, out of season clothing storage, or whatever you need.
Work with your closet containers, shelving, hangers, and spaces to create a custom closet that is perfectly suited to you.

About the Author: Charlie Hafter is on the staff of Closet Hanger Factory, a leading online resource for clothes hangers. Get all of the closet and clothes hanger accessories you could need at http://www.closethangerfactory.com, which is recognized worldwide for their excellent quality hangers.